Employees do not always turn out to be the match you hoped for when you originally hired them. You hate to terminate anyone on your workforce, but you feel doing so is ideal for everyone. Have you considered the risks involved with terminating workers? 

Chron breaks down some inherent dangers when companies let employees go. Learn how to protect yourself and the hard work you invested in your company. 

Discrimination 

A disgruntled former employee may feel like a victim of discrimination because of her or his disability, age, race or gender. To fight against any legal acts former employees may take against you, gather written documents that provide legal, valid reasons for termination. 

Wrongful termination  

Rather than discrimination, workers may feel you wrongfully terminated them. It is up to you to prove you did not engage in an illegal act, using thorough documentation as evidence. Note the exact reason for letting the person go, such as violating company policy, creating a hostile workforce or engaging in workplace harassment. 

Security 

Depending on the access the former employee had, you could have a security risk on your hands. Terminated workers sometimes take company keys, knowledge of passwords or security codes, company property and/or private company information with them. You may want to change locks, passwords and security codes after letting an employee go, no matter how trustworthy you feel the person is. Hopefully, employees with access to confidential details and information signed confidentiality agreements or nondisclosure agreements when you first brought them on. 

You hope for a positive outcome for yourself and former employees upon letting them go. Still, you must take measures to protect yourself and prepare for as many risks as possible.